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Orthopaedic News

 

Athletes' risk of concussion reduced by custom-made mouthguards

Source: Medical News Today

When it comes to buying a mouthguard, parents who want to reduce their child's risk of a sports-related concussion should visit a dentist instead of a sporting goods store.

High school football players wearing store-bought, over-the-counter (OTC) mouthguards were more than twice as likely to suffer mild traumatic brain injures (MTBI)/concussions than those wearing custom-made, properly fitted mouthguards, reports a new study in the May/June 2014 issue of General Dentistry, the peer-reviewed clinical journal of the Academy of General Dentistry (AGD).

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ACL injury risk reduced in young athletes by universal neuromuscular training

Source: Medical News Today

The ACL is a critical ligament that stabilizes the knee joint. An ACL injury, one of the most common sports injuries, often requires surgery and a lengthy period of rehabilitation before an athlete can return to sport and other activities. Recent research has found that screening tools, such as "hop" or isokinetic (computer/video) tests to identify neuromuscular deficits, as well as neuromuscular training programs, may reduce ACL injuries.

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Positive results for meniscal allograft transplantation surgery for young athletes with knee pain

Source: Medical News Today

Patients undergoing meniscal allograft transplantation (MAT) surgery require an additional operation approximately 32% of the time, but overall see a 95% success rate after an average five-year follow-up, according to new research released at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine's (AOSSM) Specialty Day.

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Sport makes muscles and nerves fit

Source: Medical News Today Endurance sport does not only change the condition and fitness of muscles but also simultaneously improves the neuronal connections to the muscle fibers based on a muscle-induced feedback. This link has been discovered by a research group at the Biozentrum of the University of Basel. The group was also able to induce the same effect through raising the protein concentration of PGC1α in the muscle.

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Collagen for the knee: Gel-like implant invented

Source: ScienceDaily

Millions of people suffer cartilage damage to the knee every year. Cartilage injuries are not only painful; they can lead to osteoarthritis decades later. In the course of the disease, the protective shock absorbing cartilage that covers the bone within the joint slowly is removed until the bone is finally exposed, typically requiring an artificial joint replacement. A biotechnology company has developed a one-step minimally-invasive surgical procedure for the treatment of cartilage defects: a gel-like implant.

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Elderly Women with Low Vitamin D Risk Fracture

Source: dailyRx

People's bones tend to grow more fragile as they age, especially in older women. But there may be factors that are within a person's control to help decrease the risk for fracture.

A recent study found that long-term vitamin D insufficiency was associated with a greater 10-year risk of having a hip or osteoporotic (bone disease) fracture in elderly women.

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Falls More Common in Arthritis Patients

Source: dailyRx

Falls are a big concern for many older adults, but should falling be something that middle-aged adults with arthritis consider, too? A new study suggests so.

The researchers found that compared to people without arthritis, arthritis patients were more likely to fall twice or more and more likely to be injured from these falls.

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Pioneering hip and stem cell surgery

Source: Medical News Today

Doctors and scientists in Southampton have completed their first hip surgery with a 3D printed implant and bone stem cell graft.

The 3D printed hip, made from titanium, was designed using the patient's CT scan and CAD CAM (computer aided design and computer aided manufacturing) technology, meaning it was designed to the patient's exact specifications and measurements.

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Rotator Cuff Repair and Immobilization

Source: MethodistOrthopedics

Shoulder rotator cuff repair aims to suture torn rotator cuff tendons and provide them with the optimal environment to heal and minimize chance of retear. Overall retear rates have decreased over the years, but are still a major concern. Better suture techniques have been thoroughly investigated but there is less attention paid to the rehabilitation protocol. Currently the gold standard for rehabilitation after surgery is to wear an abduction brace and begin physical therapy for passive range of motion within the first few weeks. As surgical techniques have evolved from open surgery to arthroscopic surgery, there are questions as to whether this rehabilitation protocol is ideal. Animal studies have shown that longer periods of immobilization are beneficial to healing after rotator cuff repair.

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Shock therapy improves pain and function in patients with chronic calcific shoulder tendinitis

Source: MedicalNewsToday

Shock therapy improves pain and function in patients with chronic calcific shoulder tendinitis, according to an article published in Annals of Internal Medicine. Rotator cuff tendonitis is one of the most common causes of shoulder pain and may present with or without calcifications. There is little evidence to suggest that conventional therapies, such as rest, ice, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, physical therapy, and subacromial corticosteroid injections can effectively ease pain or restore function. Calcific tendinitis, in particular, may be more difficult to manage and may require surgery. Extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT), which uses sound waves of high or low energy that impart rapid fluctuations of pressure to tissues, has been suggested as an alternative treatment to expensive and risky surgical interventions.

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Patients should wait at least six weeks to resume driving following shoulder replacement surgery

Source: NewsMedical

More than 53,000 Americans have total shoulder joint replacement (SJR) surgery each year, and yet the effects of this surgery on a patient’s ability to safely drive a vehicle, and the appropriate recovery time before patients should return to driving, have yet to be determined.

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New probe could help determine severity of rotator-cuff injuries

Source: MedicalXpress

A new ultrasound probe that has been developed at Clemson University could take some of the guesswork out of determining the severity of rotator-cuff injuries, making it easier for doctors to decide whether patients need surgery.

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Successful outcomes for most failed rotator cuff repairs

Source: MedicalXpress

More than half of patients with failed rotator cuff repair have successful outcomes, and the presence of retear negatively affects clinical outcomes.

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Research aims to improve repair of rotator cuff injuries

Source: MedicalXpress

Rotator cuff tears are among the most common orthopedic injuries suffered by adults in the United States, due to wear and tear or the effects of age. With a 94 percent failure rate for surgical repairs of large tears in older patients, it's no surprise that the injury is a major cause of pain and disability.

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Sleep disturbance following fracture related to emotional well being, says study

Source: NewsMedical

Sleep disturbance is an extremely common complaint following orthopaedic trauma. In a new study presented today at the 2014 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS), researchers assessed the functional status of 1,095 patients following acute fractures to the proximal humerus (shoulder), distal radius (wrist), ankle and tibial plateau (shinbone), using standard orthopaedic tests and assessments.

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Doctor offers tips to prevent injuries while shoveling snow

Source: NewsMedical

As temperatures continue to plunge and snowfall levels increase across the tri-state region, a physical therapy professor at University of the Sciences in Philadelphia reminds individuals the exertion, cold weather, and slippery surfaces snow shovelers face in these conditions are a dangerous combination.

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Surgeon describes shoulder arthropathy outcomes more than 30 years after Bristow repair for instability

Source: Healio

NEW ORLEANS — In a long-term follow-up of 31 shoulders treated with the Bristow-Latarjet repair for instability, Lennart Hovelius, MD, reported that about two-thirds of patients remained satisfied with their surgical result. Hovelius said his cases were among those from four Swedish hospitals in the original series, which was published in 1983.

“These repairs are the first we did with coracoid standing and one screw. Eleven had previously failed surgery. All patients had the follow-up with X-ray after 33 years. Results: one had revision surgery. None had further surgery of any kind,” he said.

According to Hovelius, a possible strength of this effort was that two observers twice classified nearly the amount of arthropathy in the patients using the Samilson-Prieto system during the 33-years to 35-years follow-up. However, some of the assessments of arthropathy severity varied between the observers.

“Mean values were 27% mild arthropathy, 23% moderate and 11% severe. We know that more than 50% had arthropathy 20 years after the primary dislocation,” said Hovelius.

He noted that, based on outcomes in this series, perhaps the Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index is a better system to use to assess patients after Bristow repairs. He said patient outcomes with that index better corresponded with patient’s amount of arthrosis.

“The Samilson classification is perhaps not appropriate,” Hovelius said. – by Susan M. Rapp

Reference:

Hovelius L. Paper #126. Presented at: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting; March 11-15, 2014; New Orleans.

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Trials to begin on new degradable surgical implant

Source: BBC News Health

Researchers in Oxford have developed a degradable implant which they say has huge potential to improve surgical success rates. The protective patch, which wraps round soft tissue repairs, will be trialled in patients with shoulder injuries.

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Glucosamine fails to prevent deterioration of knee cartilage, decrease pain

Source: Science Daily

Oral glucosamine supplementation is not associated with a lessening of knee cartilage deterioration among individuals with chronic knee pain, a short-term study found. Findings indicate that glucosamine does not decrease pain or improve knee bone marrow lesions -- more commonly known as bone bruises and thought to be a source of pain in those with osteoarthritis.

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More osteoarthritis noted later in life in kids who have ACL reconstruction

Source: Science Daily

Adolescents who have an Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) reconstruction are more likely to demonstrate osteoarthritic changes later in life, researchers have discovered. “Early reconstruction of ACLs is often the trend for young more skeletally mature athletes to restore knee stability and prevent progressive meniscal and/or articular cartilage damage. Often these procedures do allow individuals to return to the playing field and continue an active lifestyle. However, it is still important to evaluate long-term effects such as osteoarthritis when considering surgeries for these pediatric patients,” said the lead researcher.

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Women report more pain than men after knee replacement surgery, study shows

Source: Science Daily

One of the biggest concerns of patients considering knee replacement is the amount of pain they will have after surgery. Although it is a very successful operation overall to relieve arthritis pain and restore function, persistent postoperative pain can be a problem for some individuals. Researchers determined which patients were at highest risk for increased postoperative pain based on demographic and surgical variables.

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Silk-based surgical implants could offer a better way to repair broken bones

Source: Science Daily

Using pure silk protein derived from silkworm cocoons, investigators have developed surgical plates and screws that offer improved remodeling following injury and can be absorbed by the body over time. When a person suffers a broken bone, current treatment calls for the surgeon to insert screws and plates to help bond the broken sections and enable the fracture to heal. These "fixation devices" are usually made of metal alloys. But metal devices may have disadvantages: Because they are stiff and unyielding, they can cause stress to underlying bone, among other problems.

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Chance of falling after knee replacement not increased by regional anesthesia

Source: Science Daily

Two types of regional anesthesia do not make patients more prone to falls in the first days after having knee replacement surgery as some have previously suggested, according to a study based on nearly 200,000 patient records. Regional forms of anesthesia – spinal or epidural (neuraxial) anesthesia and peripheral nerve blocks (PNB) – which only numb the area of the body that requires surgery, provide better pain control and faster rehabilitation and fewer complications than general anesthesia, research shows. But some surgeons avoid using them due to concerns regional anesthesia may cause motor weakness, making patients more likely to fall when they are walking in the first days after knee replacement surgery.

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Select rheumatoid arthritis patients can safely undergo same-day double knee replacement

Source: Medical News Today

Same-day bilateral knee replacement surgery is safe for select patients with rheumatoid arthritis, researchers from Hospital for Special Surgery in New York have found.

Generally, patients with an inflammatory systemic disease such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are sicker than patients with the degenerative condition osteoarthritis (OA), says senior study author Mark Figgie, M.D., chief of the Surgical Arthritis Service at Hospital for Special Surgery, and the hospital's first Allan E. Inglis, MD, Chair in Surgical Arthritis.

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The leading cause of failed prosthetic knee joints is infection

Source: Medical News Today

The number of total knee replacement (TKR) procedures continues to climb, as does the number of revision total knee replacement (RTKR) surgeries.

Elderly and female patients with a moderate number of comorbidities represented the largest proportion of the revision population. The authors suggest that optimizing patient health before surgery and paying meticulous attention to efforts by the surgical team to minimize the risk of periprosthetic joint infection may decrease the number of knee replacement revisions.

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Improving knee replacements with iASSIST system

Source: Science Daily

Each year, approximately 600,000 total knee replacement procedures are performed in the United States, a number that is expected to rise in the next decade as the population ages. For the first time in the United States, an iASSIST system is now in use. iASSIST is a computer navigation system with Bluetooth-like technology that improves surgical precision and accuracy in total knee replacements, decreasing the need for revision surgery.

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Improving healing in Achilles tendon injuries by embedding stem cells inside sutures

Source: Medical News Today

Achilles tendon injuries are common for professional, collegiate and recreational athletes. These injuries are often treated surgically to reattach or repair the tendon if it has been torn. Patients have to keep their legs immobilized for a while after surgery before beginning their rehabilitation. Athletes may return to their activities sooner, but risk re-rupturing the tendon if it has not healed completely.

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82% of college football players return to field after ACL surgery, shows study

Source: News Medical

High-level college football players frequently return to the field after an ACL reconstruction, according to research presented today at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine's (AOSSM) Specialty Day. The study added to earlier research by exploring specific factors that affected return to play, including player standing on rosters and year in school.

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Houston Methodist sports medicine experts discuss important facts about mouthguards

Source: News Medical

After every play, we all see the athletes adjusting their mouthguards, but what do they actually protect? Houston Methodist sports medicine experts discuss important facts about mouthguards.

Can wearing a mouthguard prevent a concussion?

"No, mouthguards cannot prevent a concussion," said Dr. Vijay Jotwani, a sports medicine-focused primary care physician with Houston Methodist Orthopedics & Sports Medicine. "Mouthguards do not affect the movement of the brain within the skull and cerebrospinal fluid, so they are ineffective at reducing the forces on the brain that cause concussions."

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Kids Who Played Sports Made Healthy Food Choices

Source: Daily Rx

Playing a sport is a healthy physical activity for kids, but does it promote healthy food and drink choices as well?

Over 75 percent of boys and 69 percent of girls in middle elementary grades play sports. It has already been shown that high school kids who play sports eat more fruits and vegetables than those who don't play sports, but food and drink habits in elementary kids who play sports have not been well studied.

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Brain-training game improves vision and success of baseball players

Source: Medical News Today

In baseball, vision can play a key role in a player's success. If they have trouble seeing the ball, chances are they could be out after three strikes. But new research from the University of California, Riverside, suggests that a brain-training video game could help to improve the vision of baseball players and, in turn, help them win more games.

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Ready to Get in Shape? Ease Into Exercise, Experts Say

Source: US News

Watching the Winter Olympics in Sochi may inspire some to get off the couch and begin working out or playing sports, but it's important to ease into these activities, an expert suggests.

"Just watching these events can serve as a tremendous inspiration to shape up, change or start a physical activity or sports regimen," Jim Thornton, president of the National Athletic Trainers' Association, said in a news release from the group.

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How to Prevent Winter Sports Injuries

Source: US News

Get out and enjoy winter but take steps to protect yourself from common ski- and snowboard-related injuries such as sprains, strains, dislocations and fractures, an orthopedist says.

"No matter your skill level, everyone is susceptible to injury on the slopes," said Dr. Allston Stubbs, an associate professor of orthopedics at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, said in a center news release. "Most of these injuries happen at the end of the day, so you may want to think twice before going for 'one last run,' especially when you're tired."

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Reducing the risk of falls by motivating older people to do preventative exercise

Source: Medical News Today

Simple strength and balance training can effectively help to prevent falls, but Bournemouth University research shows only a minority of older people will carry out these exercises.

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Ways to help manage chronic bone and joint pain

Source: Medical News Today

The majority of chronic pain complaints concern the musculoskeletal system, but they also include headaches and abdominal pain. "As orthopaedic surgeons, we are experts in the management of acute injuries to the extremities and spine.

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Promising results from minimally invasive back surgery

Source: Medical News Today

Beaumont research findings published in the February online issue of Spine shows that patients who have a low back surgery called minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, end up better off in many ways than patients who have more invasive surgery to alleviate debilitating pain.

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Yoga and Pilates For Back Ache

Source: Back Pain Relief Daily

Yoga and Pilates for back ache help to maintain proper posture and are recommended by physiotherapists and doctors. Iyengar Yoga and Stott Pilates have many benefits, according to this article, through providing relief from different injuries and lead to a healthy lifestyle. Iyengar Yoga has become very popular because it helps by creating equality and awareness of spiritual, physical, emotional, and mental levels.

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Ways To Prevent Lower Back Problems

Source: Back Pain Relief Daily

The following ways to prevent lower back problems will help to keep an individual engaged in daily activities without risking any injury to the back or neck. Changing the body position frequently and taking breaks during activities is important to prevent putting strain on the spine.

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